APR
18
2008

Building KDE on openSUSE was never easier

I've just published the Building KDE on openSUSE guide over at the openSUSE wiki. It makes it insanely easy to build latest KDE 4.1 in a minimal number of steps, but the goal is not just to make it easy, but to give people the tools and the skills to go from just building KDE to developing it.

APR
1
2008

Update - GSoC application period extended, another project idea

Google have extended the Summer of Code 2008 student application deadline until April 7 so if you were busy last week or concerned your application wasn't good enough, now's your chance to get it in.

MAR
28
2008

Enhance KDE on openSUSE for Google's Summer of Code 2008

Student? Love KDE and/or openSUSE? Want to get 0x1194 bucks for improving them? Then check out the openSUSE Google Summer of Code ideas page or suggest your own project. There are a number of projects listed already which would improve KDE on openSUSE and upstream. As well as getting paid, it's an opportunity to work on a real world project, and learn from the experience of some leading KDE and openSUSE developers.

MAR
26
2008

openSUSE KDE IRC meeting

Some people already think we do a damn fine job packaging KDE at openSUSE. But we're just a few guys and we'd do it even better with your help. Tonight at 1900UTC we're having our latest openSUSE-KDE IRC meeting in #opensuse-kde on FreeNode and we'd love to see you there.

MAR
20
2008

KDE at Novell's BrainShare event

Over in Salt Lake City, Utah, Novell's BrainShare 2008 event is taking place. This is where the faithful come to see what's new and good in the big red N world every year, and what would be better to liven up a wintry landscape than a colourful talk about KDE 4? The KDE Team here at Novell have worked our KPats off all over KDE 4 to make it great and the Novell customer base deserve to know about it.

JAN
18
2008

16:38 MV CA

I'll keep this short because my mental batteries are running a bit low. Yesterday Dirk, Cornelius and myself from SUSE travelled to Mountain View in California for the KDE 4 launch event at Google. So far we had BoFs on marketing, distributions (always fun), and now it's Plasma's turn. Apart from that we had a nice lunch - even if the food didn't quite satisfy all the hungry hacker appetites present.

JAN
11
2008

KDE 4.0 @ openSUSE

The nice thing about a community event is the way it brings everyone together. I just gave a presentation to all my colleagues at the SUSE office here in Nuernberg on KDE 4.0, what it brings to the table and where it's going in the future. It was great to have our two largest meeting rooms joined together, with a capacity audience. For the last few weeks Dirk, Stephan, Lubos and I on the KDE Team have been working all the hours we can to add the final polish to 4.0 and to make sure the openSUSE packages of KDE 4.0 are the freshest and highest quality KDE binaries available.

DEC
23
2007

System Settings gets Interviewed

I decided a couple of weeks ago to sort System Settings out and here is the first result: I reworked the views using Qt4's InterView framework, reusing the KCategorizedView from Dolphin. This gives us a better quality view than the hard coded view used until now - item layout should work at large font sizes or high res displays. It will also make it much easier to improve the UI with custom delegates and category drawers in future - just by reusing code. I was able to chuck out a couple of classes entirely which will make System Settings easier to maintain.

DEC
10
2007

KDE 4 'consumes 39% less memory than its predecessor'

Not mine, but one Korneliusz Jarzebski (in Polish) has done the numbers (pro-linux coverage in German) and produced a chart showing exactly how the RAM consumption of comparable KDE4 and KDE3 sessions measure up. The result is a mindblowing 39% smaller memory footprint in KDE 4. This just goes to show, that it's worth making large-scale changes to your desktop environment to get the fruit hanging on the higher branches.

DEC
10
2007

KDE 4: like a dream on 256Mb/1Ghz/Intel!

So someone just asked in #kde4-devel whether it was worth trying KDE 4 on a 2500Mhz/256Mb computer and I was characteristically careful and guessed "It will work, but won't be good.". Then I decided to put my money where my mouth is and booted my Thinkpad X60 with "mem=256M maxcpus=1", logged into KDE 4 and set the power saving policy to "Powersave", which throttles the CPU to 1Ghz and locks it there. And then I used KDE 4 some, started Konqueror, browsed about a bit, configured a few things with System Settings, started Kopete and chatted a little.

Pages