AUG
15
2017

Running applications and unittests without "make install"

In our Akademy presentation, Kévin and I showed the importance for a better developer story to be able to work on a KDE module without having to install it. Running unittests and running applications without installing the module at all is possible, it turns out, it just needs a bit of effort to set things up correctly.

MAY
20
2017

Simon 0.4.90 beta released

The second version (0.4.90) towards Simon 0.5.0 is out in the wilds. Please download the source code, test it and send us feedback.

What we changed since the alpha release:

MAY
19
2017

Join us at Akademy 2017 in Almería!

This July KDE's user and developer community is once again going to come together at Akademy, our largest annual gathering.

I'm going there this year as well, and you'll even be able to catch me on stage giving a talk on Input Methods in Plasma 5. Here's the talk abstract to hopefully whet your appetite:


An overview over the How and Why of Input Methods support (including examples of international writing systems, emoji and word completion) in Plasma on both X11 and Wayland, its current status and challenges, and the work ahead of us.

Text input is the foundational means of human-computer interaction: We configure or systems, program them, and express ourselves through them by writing. Input Methods help us along by converting hardware events into text - complex conversion being a requirement for many international writing systems, new writing systems such as emoji, and at the heart of assistive text technologies such as word completion and spell-checking.

This talk will illustrate the application areas for Input Methods by example, presenting short introductions to several international writing systems as well as emoji input. It will explain why solid Input Methods support is vital to KDE's goal of inclusivity and how Input Methods can make the act of writing easier for all of us.

It will consolidate input from the Input Methods development and user community to provide a detailed overview over the current Input Methods technical architecture and user experience in Plasma, as well as free systems in general. It will dive into existing pain points and present both ongoing work and plans to address them.


This will actually be the first time I'm giving a presentation at Akademy! It's a topic close to my heart, and I hope I can do a decent job conveying a snaphot of all the great and important work people are doing in this area to your eyes and ears.

See you there!

APR
23
2017

Current state of Babe

A better view of this post can be found here:
https://medium.com/@temisclopeolimac/current-state-of-babe-9fb56ce16ac6

To continue my last post about Babe [1] where I wrote about a little of its history, in this new entry (I’ve now switched from the KDE blogs to Medium) I will tell you about the current state of Babe and the features implemented so far.
[1] https://blogs.kde.org/2017/04/14/introducing-babe-history

So welcome to this walk through Babe:

APR
14
2017

Introducing Babe - History

https://babe.kde.org/

This is my very first post for KDE blogs and it is also my very first application. So when I sit down to think about what to write about I thought I would like to tell you all about how and why I wanted to start coding and then why I decided to create a (yet another (i know)) music player, specially made for KDE/Plasma.

So here comes the story:

APR
6
2017

Complex text input in Plasma

Binary keyboard
Surprisingly not enough

A brief note: If you're a developer or user of input methods in the free desktop space, or just interested in learning about "How does typing Chinese work anyway?", you might be interested in a discussion we're now having on the plasma-devel mailing list. In my opening mail I've tried to provide a general overview about what input methods are used for, how they work, who they benefit, and what we must do to improve support for them in KDE Plasma.

Bringing high-quality text input to as many language users as possible, as well as surfacing functionality such as Emoji input and word completion in a better way, is something we increasingly care about. With the situation around complex text input on Wayland and specifically KWin still in a state of flux and needing-to-crystallize, we're looking to form closer ties with developers and users in this space. Feel free to chime in on the list or hang out with us in #plasma on freenode.

APR
3
2017

Simon 0.4.80 alpha released

The first version (0.4.80) towards Simon 0.5.0 is out in the wilds. Please download the source code, test it and send us feedback.

Some new features are:

MAR
22
2017

Looking for a job ?

Are you looking for a C++/Qt/Linux developer job in Germany ?
Then maybe this is something for you: Sharp Reflections

I'm looking forward to hear from you. :-)
Alex

MAR
13
2017

New life in Simon speech recognition

As my blog as FSFE Fellow No. 1 is temporarily not aggregated on planet.kde.org and my private blog about woodwork (German only) currently only tells about a wooden staircase (but soon again about wooden jewelry) I'm building I found a new place for my KDE (non-Randa) related stuff: KDE Blogs. Thanks to the KDE Sysadmin team for the quick setup!

MAR
10
2017

Fear not, OMG! Ubuntu! You will bounce again!

Serving the quadruped audience

Intrepid journalist Joey Sneddon over at OMG! Ubuntu! recently pointed out to us that Plasma 5 is currently not doing so well when it comes to serving an important user demographic - bored cats!

Indeed, Plasma 5.0 cost them (and us) the Bouncy Ball widget. And the reasoning mentioned in the article ([...] when trying to develop a professional experience toys and gimicks aren’t a good thing to be shipping by default [...]) is actually pretty solid I think. Hmm.

Have we lost our bounce forever? No!

But! These days we have the sexy KDE Store going on, which is a great place to put toys and gimmicks (along with neat menus).

So it's back! Behold the demo:

Bouncy Ball v2.0 on Plasma 5
Bouncy Ball v2.0 on Plasma 5

You can grab it now for your Plasma 5 via Add Widgets... in your desktop menu and then Get new widgets in the Widget Explorer, or check out the Bouncy Ball store page.

Now for some additional fine print, though: I wrote this at ludicrous speed over a Friday night, and it's not well-tested. It behaves a little quirky sometimes (the goal was to match the original closely, but I didn't have a running KDE 4 to refer to). And despite the v2.0 moniker, it's still missing some of the features of the old Ball, including auto-bounce and that satisfying Boing! sound on collisions. I went with v2.0 in honor of the heritage - I'll polish it and add back the missing features a little later!

Update Bouncy Ball v2.1 is now on the store with sound support, auto-bounce, much better mouse response, a configurable simulation tick and a few bugfixes!

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