OCT
6
2008

Running TiddlyWiki on the N810

One of the nicest applications I've found for the Nokia N810 is a single html page! TiddlyWiki consists of a page called 'empty.html' that you download and copy when you want to create a new Wiki. It works just like a traditional Wiki but is single user, and doesn't need a web server. The code for the Wiki is embedded within the page as JavaScript and CSS.

To use TiddlyWiki on the N810 I needed to fix a problem with JavaScript warnings when saving anything on the N810. I found some instructions here and here. You need to enter 'about:config' as a URL and the browser allows you to add and edit preferences. Add these two key/value pairs to the preferences to allow local file:// URLs to be edited:

capability.principal.codebase.p0.granted
UniversalXPConnect  UniversalBrowserRead

capability.principal.codebase.p0.id 
file://

It made me think how easily web applications adapt to small devices like the Nokia. I wonder if it would be a good idea to have a custom web server always running, that could handle the UI for the main menus instead of the current menu system, and replace simple apps like the Bookmarks and Notes ones.

Comments

A local web server has many uses. It makes it easier to browse local HTML and have local absolute links still work. When carting around lots of static content it might be nice to store files locally as foo.html.gz and be able to transparently browse them. But I cannot figure out how to get a standalone web browser to do this, it has to negotiate with a server (browser requests with "Accept-Encoding: gzip" header, server sends back compressed files with "Content-Encoding: gzip"). If you're running with a compressed file system like JFFS2 it may not matter.

TiddlyWiki is indeed nice. It's a new way to deal with local information by manipulating it in a browser -- you go to a web page to edit a shopping list, update a playlist, etc. If local programs don't adapt to this usage users will consider them hopelessly obsolete. These days your local disk is just a cache of possibly-expired stuff from the web, so operating systems, local web servers, browsers, and KParts in the browser should evolve and intertwine to treat it as such.


By skierpage at Mon, 10/06/2008 - 22:56