MAY
13
2005

Safari and KHTML

Notice how there isn't a vs in the title? :)

Hyatt and Maciej joined us on IRC yesterday, and we had some really good discussions. I might as well also admit that Maciejs comment was true (but out of context). Please notice that that implies we are discussing solutions and a common future. The idea of a common source tree is pretty much abandoned as we have very different goals and requirements, but we are discussing improved cooperation. With Apple just having released Tiger and us preparing for KDE4 we have a unique opportunity for bringing our source trees closer again.

Since Apple is being a nice guy for the time being, I will let them announce how things will improve once we have a solution, but please, no more "vs." stories for the time being, we are working on solving it.

Comments

Konqueror works extremely well for standards-compliant pages but the problem is that is just the minority of the web :( ... so that's where I feel Apple's contribution back to KHTML could benefit Konqueror.

Hoping for the best,
Swaroop
--
Blog: http://www.swaroopch.info


By Swaroop C H at Fri, 05/13/2005 - 13:30

great news .. hope it turns out well; i've got my fingers crossed for you guys.


By Aaron J. Seigo at Fri, 05/13/2005 - 17:16

My current project is pure GPL, derived from a commercial product at one of our clients. I pushed hard to get them to open source it, but we both knew that the company would not be willing to pour money into the open source part forever. That is why the NIH, rather than the pharmaceutical company is paying for it at the moment.

My first thought on reading "Two years after hailing Apple as a white knight, those developers are calling the relationship between their group and the computer maker a 'bitter failure.'" at news.com was not positive. To be frank, I truly hoped that it was a comment taken out of context, because as phrased, it sure sounded unprofessional. Not because you are unhappy with how the collaboration turned out, but because airing dirty laundry in public reflect poorly on the person doing it.

Put another way, would you really expect any other potential collaborators to want to risk having their name associated with 'dismal failure' in public? I sure would not be eager to run that risk.

By using an open source project as the basis for WebCore, Apple fought the Not Invented Here image they had built up. On the other side of the ledger, they poured a lot of work into WebCore, and, as the license requires, made that work available. I have not looked at the code, so I cannot verify Maciej's contention the WC has seen more change, and that a backport might make sense. I do know, though, that Apple being willing to multiplatform their own engineering work is pretty unusual. That they are still talking, rather than just forking, is a good sign, and one that means commitment.

The "dismal failure' comment earned Apple a whole bunch of negative publicity. That comment, as presented by CNet, has made it harder for Apple people to justify open source efforts, and has damaged the credibility of the people who pushed for KHTML's adoption in WebCore. That may be worth it, from your perspective, but was that your real intent?

Public statements live forever, and often go far beyond what the original person meant.

I do hope you work out your differences with Apple, one way or the other. They are putting a lot of dollars into their work, and it would be handy if that work could be of use to you guys.

Scott
--
Scott Ellsworth
[email protected]
Java and database consulting for the life sciences


By Scott Ellsworth at Fri, 05/13/2005 - 18:04

well... if something is popular it evidently will be shifted with something fresh, new. So Safari still can be all the rage))


By clyopa at Thu, 08/23/2007 - 08:47