JUL
31
2003

KJots, interuptus

Worked a bit more on KJots last night. I'm nearly finished with everything I'm going to do with it for 3.2, then I can move on to finishing up work on KsCD, then I can move on to TOM and KMail headers, attachments and folder properties. Insert regular bug fixing obsession sprees and the unpredictable random distractions in there and that's probably my KDE life from here to 3.2.

Today I won't be so lucky as to make much, if any, progress on that list. Good thing I was up to 3:00am last night, then. ;-)

Yesterday I got an email from Eugenia of osnews.com fame. It was basically a feature request for KCalc (and GNOME's calculator) from her "OS engineer, used to work on BeOS" husband: copy and pasting of formulas into the calculator from external sources. She CC'd no less than 7 people in KDE and GNOME on that email. I politely responded with a thank you for taking the time to send the email, and that bugs.kde.org is the best place to register such feature requests so they don't get lost and can be triaged by the maintainer, blah blah blah... you know the drill. She replies (CC'ing all four KDE devs from her original CC list!) saying that she can't be bothered to register to submit a wishlist on bugs.kde.org. Apparently she set up accounts on three other bugzilla systems that day to report bugs and had had enough. Oh well.

At the same time, I can empathize with her. We really SHOULD have a common account DB for OSS bugzilla systems to use. The best would likely be a replicated DB that is kept locally on each Bugzilla system, though that would require more admin work and some DB table restructuring which probably means Bugzilla hacking too. So while we SHOULD, I doubt we WILL any time soon.

Oh, and I don't have email today! I wake up to discover that my mail server is not to be found on the 'Net. I rush down to where it is (thankfully only 15 minutes away) to find the ethernet cable dangling against the wall not even plugged into the server! Somone had unplugged it, no WONDER I couldn't reach it. Gah! So I plug it back in, but still no-go.

Apparently the people who are hosting the DNS and manage that block of IPs did a whole bunch of network reorg the night before. Our mail server was using two too many IPs, thanks to our wunderkind Debian admin Cade (thankfully his security expertise is orders of magnitude better than his admin skills ;)). Cade happens to be in Greece at the moment with his girlfriend. So, lacking a way to get a hold of him, and not realizing that I had root access to the box, they just unplug it and reassign the IPs and just like that Huzzah! no email for Aaron!

I get on the phone with them, fix things up, and now I just have to wait for DNS propagation. GAAAAAAAAAH!

Oh, and did I mention I have a section of a project I need to finish up for work by tomorrow? Losing half the day to network stupdity helps, as does the football (soccer for you N. Americans ;)) game I have tonight.

KDE.... take me away!

Comments

I agree. Having to register on bugs.kde.org just to submit a bug is quite ridiculous.

I can't tell you how many people won't bother with that kind of nonsense.


By KDE User at Thu, 07/31/2003 - 19:53

We need a valid e-mail address with a bug. Otherwise a report filed is mostly likely useless, as it's impossible to ask for a follow up... Oh, and the
report wizard registers you automatically, given a valid e-mail. All it
takes is a few clicks.

-Maks


By KDE User at Thu, 07/31/2003 - 20:20

You *do* have a valid email address with the bug report... afterall she sent it by email to several developers. If all she had to do was Cc: [email protected] that would have been fine. Don't ask people to run some silly wizard and/or go through some annoying web registration.

Ask Linus if he will "register" to send in new KDE bugs...


By KDE User at Fri, 08/01/2003 - 14:58

Linus bugs

He does seem to think that it's perfectly fine and a very organized way of reporting bugs. I for one wouldn't know about many of the bugs because I'm not on the mailing lists. And browsing hundreds of mails in the archive with non-standard subjects probably is not fun, effecient, productive, or useful.


By KDE User at Fri, 08/01/2003 - 15:57

Look closely.

These are bug reports imported from 2001.

We had a nice email bug system back then.


By KDE User at Fri, 08/01/2003 - 19:20

Submitting a bug is more than just saying something is wrong. What if the developer can't reproduce the problem? How is the developer supposed to fix it unless you are willing to contribute a bit of time and effort in helping them? If a person is unwilling to spend a bit of time on bugs.kde.org to report, then the report may very well be useless.

There is no problem gathering information about bugs. The problem is gathering information about the solution.

Derek


By dkite at Sat, 08/02/2003 - 03:04

That's what the Liberty Alliance is for. The main problem is that there is no free implementation for the Liberty framework (and also that all the free software world is years behind in supporting XML and WebService standards, the only option for implementing this on Linux is Java).


By tjansen at Thu, 07/31/2003 - 20:06

Yes, the Liberty Alliance will finally give OSS a single-sign-on framework so we can obtain an identity from a known provider and then use this identity for all web-based transactions like amazon.com, email / bugzilla, and other service-like functions previously only offered through the likes of passport.

The only thing is determining 'who' will be the known, certified identity providers ... it's kind of like deciding who should be able to sign and register a ssh certificate. Last I heard there was some hub-bub about AOL wanting to be 'the' service provider and only them. That's clearly not really what was intended and surely slowed things down.


By KDE User at Thu, 07/31/2003 - 21:08

If this should happen and there is only one provider (which is against the original purpose, to have a distributed architecture instead of a MS Passport-like centralized one) it's likely that someone will use the technology to set up a competing trust network.


By tjansen at Thu, 07/31/2003 - 22:00